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[Forum Game] 1k Comments

Flash85538 (US1)Flash85538 (US1) Posts: 1,212
edited 12.06.2018 in Goodgame Empire - Art/Lore
Hey Y'all!

Was pretty bored so I thought, why not make a game on forums? Well as you can see, that's what I did. This is how the game goes basically.

In a month from now, (July 12th, 2018) we need to get this discussion to 1000 comments. The 1000th commenter will win the game, thus have bragging rights over everyone else. 

Rules:

1) You cannot spam, meaning, if you have posted once, you must wait for another comment from someone other than yourself to post again. 
2) Keep it semi-civil, kids play this game and are on forums. 
3) Have fun!

Keep in mind this is completely random, you can say anything you want. Leave a link, an emoji, a poem, a word, even a picture... anything works. If the post does not reach 1k comments in a month, no one will win and I will ask a Moderator to close the post. 

I'll start...

I'm Flash! How are you?

 Deputy of S.I.N

A chain is only as strong as its weakest link. 

 Roses fall, but the thorns remain.


Comments

  • I'm Great!!!!

    When does RIP Rose Society Pt2 start?
  • Poop is brown
    Pee is yellow
    I like poop
    because its brown and mellow


  • I'm Great!!!!

    When does RIP Rose Society Pt2 start?
    Who knows, we'll see!

     Deputy of S.I.N

    A chain is only as strong as its weakest link. 

     Roses fall, but the thorns remain.


  • benja084 (ES1)benja084 (ES1) ES1 Posts: 9,678
    1.000???

    I took a thread to 10.000...

    Everything can be done with help, dedication, and boredom... a lot of the latter actually.
    cat

    "There is no such a thing as an empty space or an empty time. There is always something to see, something to hear"
    "To pay attention, that is our endless and propper work"

    "No existe tal cosa como un espacio vacío o un tiempo vacio. Siempre hay algo que ver, algo que oír"
    "Prestar atención, ese es nuestro interminable y apropiado trabajo"
  • VenomЖ (US1)VenomЖ (US1) US1 Posts: 110
    1.000???

    I took a thread to 10.000...

    Everything can be done with help, dedication, and boredom... a lot of the latter actually.

    It's EN forums, more chance of beating KoN than getting a thread to 10K comments in a month here :P
  • 1.000???

    I took a thread to 10.000...

    Everything can be done with help, dedication, and boredom... a lot of the latter actually.
    Then pleasr! Advertise this one! :D

     Deputy of S.I.N

    A chain is only as strong as its weakest link. 

     Roses fall, but the thorns remain.


  • Revanth6 (IN1)Revanth6 (IN1) IN1 Posts: 13
    This Is Forum
  • benja084 (ES1)benja084 (ES1) ES1 Posts: 9,678
    Once upon a time...


    There was a thread with an ambicious goal: It wanted to get 1K comments.

    Everyone was saying that it wasn't possible to do it, but one guy had faith in that thread...
    cat

    "There is no such a thing as an empty space or an empty time. There is always something to see, something to hear"
    "To pay attention, that is our endless and propper work"

    "No existe tal cosa como un espacio vacío o un tiempo vacio. Siempre hay algo que ver, algo que oír"
    "Prestar atención, ese es nuestro interminable y apropiado trabajo"
  • Funny stuff!

     Deputy of S.I.N

    A chain is only as strong as its weakest link. 

     Roses fall, but the thorns remain.


  • Ian9years (US1)Ian9years (US1) US1 Posts: 128
    Here is my comment...
  • yumm

     Deputy of S.I.N

    A chain is only as strong as its weakest link. 

     Roses fall, but the thorns remain.


  • David Noble (US1)David Noble (US1) Posts: 2,552
    edited 15.06.2018
    This is the 12th comment here. We are still like 988 comments away from completing the game. But, when you mentioned "kids play on this game and are on forums" does that include Spongebob Squarepants as well? He may be considered a kid to "some people" because of his behavior that may be considered immature on "some episodes", but the actor behind the voice of Spongebob is actually an adult and also played a more mature role as Ice King from Adventure Time and also sang "Now that we are men" and even got drunk on Goofy Goober ice cream with Patrick Star as well on the first Spongebob movie. The cartoon 'Doug" that used to air on t.v with the main character Doug who also supposed to be a kid as well was actually voiced by a grown up as well and those are only just a few examples out of many. lol.

    All jokes aside some people who you might think are kids may not actually be kids and people you might think are grown up might actually be a child under the age of 13. A child who is only 12 years old for example may act more grown up than even some adults who are aged 20+. We can keep it semi civil here, but just saying some people on the game and the forum might actually be older or younger than you think as well.
    David Noble @ usa 1
  • VenomЖ (US1)VenomЖ (US1) US1 Posts: 110
    This is the 12th comment here. We are still like 988 comments away from completing the game. But, when you mentioned "kids play on this game and are on forums" does that include Spongebob Squarepants as well? He may be considered a kid to "some people" because of his behavior that may be considered immature on "some episodes", but the actor behind the voice of Spongebob is actually an adult and also played a more mature role as Ice King from Adventure Time and also sang "Now that we are men" and even got drunk on Goofy Goober ice cream with Patrick Star as well on the first Spongebob movie. The cartoon 'Doug" that used to air on t.v with the main character Doug who also supposed to be a kid as well was actually voiced by a grown up as well and those are only just a few examples out of many. lol.

    All jokes aside some people who you might think are kids may not actually be kids and people you might think are grown up might actually be a child under the age of 13. A child who is only 12 years old for example may act more grown up than even some adults who are aged 20+. We can keep it semi civil here, but just saying some people on the game and the forum might actually be older or younger than you think as well.

    bro ice king a pedophile, spongebob works, educating himself about how to drive. don't diss my boi spongie - Patrick
  • Flash85538 (US1)Flash85538 (US1) Posts: 1,212
    edited 15.06.2018
    This is the 12th comment here. We are still like 988 comments away from completing the game. But, when you mentioned "kids play on this game and are on forums" does that include Spongebob Squarepants as well? He may be considered a kid to "some people" because of his behavior that may be considered immature on "some episodes", but the actor behind the voice of Spongebob is actually an adult and also played a more mature role as Ice King from Adventure Time and also sang "Now that we are men" and even got drunk on Goofy Goober ice cream with Patrick Star as well on the first Spongebob movie. The cartoon 'Doug" that used to air on t.v with the main character Doug who also supposed to be a kid as well was actually voiced by a grown up as well and those are only just a few examples out of many. lol.

    All jokes aside some people who you might think are kids may not actually be kids and people you might think are grown up might actually be a child under the age of 13. A child who is only 12 years old for example may act more grown up than even some adults who are aged 20+. We can keep it semi civil here, but just saying some people on the game and the forum might actually be older or younger than you think as well.
    Not gonna read all that too long for me. Anyway, please make a MM in your alliance with a link to this game so we can get to 1k comments!

     Deputy of S.I.N

    A chain is only as strong as its weakest link. 

     Roses fall, but the thorns remain.


    • Above Man’s war-wracked world a veteran throng
    • Of singing spirits gather in the air,
    • Called from the Poets’ Heaven to take their share
    • In Right’s impending victory over Wrong.
    • Far in their van the Eagle Eye of Song
    • Looms o’er Ravenna, where he died, and where
    • He saw God’s Freedom in the dazzling glare
    • Of visions, which to every race belong.
    • Him his redeemed, united Italy —
    • Her Alps new crowned with Monza’s iron band,
    • Her Hadria wedded with her Doge’s ring —
    • Hails as the Prophet-Bard of Liberty;
    • And bids the free of every tongue and land
    • Join in her Ave, and their tribute bring.
    • The Wood and the Mountain

      • When half way through the journey of our life
      • I found that I was in a gloomy wood,
      • because the path which led aright was lost.
      • And ah, how hard it is to say just what
      • this wild and rough and stubborn woodland was,
      • the very thought of which renews my fear!
      • So bitter ’t is, that death is little worse;
      • but of the good to treat which there I found,
      • I ’ll speak of what I else discovered there.
      • I cannot well say how I entered it,
      • so full of slumber was I at the moment
      • when I forsook the pathway of the truth;
      • but after I had reached a mountain’s foot,
      • where that vale ended which had pierced my heart
      • with fear, I looked on high,
      • and saw its shoulders
      • mantled already with that planet’s rays
      • which leadeth one aright o’er every path.
      • Then quieted a little was the fear,
      • which in the lake-depths of my heart had lasted
      • throughout the night I passed so piteously.
      [[5]]
      • And even as he who, from the deep emerged
      • with sorely troubled breath upon the shore,
      • turns round, and gazes at the dangerous water;
      • even so my mind, which still was fleeing on,
      • turned back to look again upon the pass
      • which ne’er permitted any one to live.
      • When I had somewhat eased my weary body,
      • o’er the lone slope I so resumed my way,
      • that e’er the lower was my steady foot.
      • Then lo, not far from where the ascent began,
      • a Leopard which, exceeding light and swift,
      • was covered over with a spotted hide,
      • and from my presence did not move away;
      • nay, rather, she so hindered my advance,
      • that more than once I turned me to go back.
      • Some time had now from early morn elapsed,
      • and with those very stars the sun was rising
      • that in his escort were, when Love Divine
      • in the beginning moved those beauteous things;
      • I therefore had as cause for hoping well
      • of that wild beast with gaily mottled skin,
      • the hour of daytime and the year’s sweet season;
      • but not so, that I should not fear the sight,
      • which next appeared before me, of a Lion,
      • — against me this one seemed to be advancing
      • with head erect and with such raging hunger,
      • that even the air seemed terrified thereby —
      [[7]]
      • and of a she-Wolf, which with every lust
      • seemed in her leanness laden, and had caused
      • many ere now to lead unhappy lives.
      • The latter so oppressed me with the fear
      • that issued from her aspect, that I lost
      • the hope I had of winning to the top.
      • And such as he is, who is glad to gain,
      • and who, when times arrive that make him lose,
      • weeps and is saddened in his every thought;
      • such did that peaceless animal make me,
      • which, ’gainst me coming, pushed me, step by step,
      • back to the place where silent is the sun.
      • While toward the lowland I was falling fast,
      • the sight of one was offered to mine eyes,
      • who seemed, through long continued silence, weak.
      • When him in that vast wilderness I saw,
      • “Have pity on me,” I cried out to him,
      • “whate’er thou be, or shade, or very man!”
      • “Not man,” he answered, “I was once a man;
      • and both my parents were of Lombardy,
      • and Mantuans with respect to fatherland.
      • ’Neath Julius was I born, though somewhat late,
      • and under good Augustus’ rule I lived
      • in Rome, in days of false and lying gods.
      • I was a poet, and of that just man,
      • Anchises’ son, I sang, who came from Troy
      • after proud Ilion had been consumed.
      [[9]]
      • But thou, to such sore trouble why return?
      • Why climbst thou not the Mountain of Delight,
      • which is of every joy the source and cause?”
      • “Art thou that Virgil, then, that fountain-head
      • which poureth forth so broad a stream of speech?”
      • I answered him with shame upon my brow.
      • “O light and glory of the other poets,
      • let the long study, and the ardent love
      • which made me con thy book, avail me now.
      • Thou art my teacher and authority;
      • thou only art the one from whom I took
      • the lovely manner which hath done me honor.
      • Behold the beast on whose account I turned;
      • from her protect me, O thou famous Sage,
      • for she makes both my veins and pulses tremble!”
      • “A different course from this must thou pursue,”
      • he answered, when he saw me shedding tears,
      • “if from this wilderness thou wouldst escape;
      • for this wild beast, on whose account thou criest,
      • alloweth none to pass along her way,
      • but hinders him so greatly, that she kills;
      • and is by nature so malign and guilty,
      • that never doth she sate her greedy lust,
      • but after food is hungrier than before.
      • Many are the animals with which she mates,
      • and still more will there be, until the Hound
      • shall come, and bring her to a painful death.
      [[11]]
      • He shall not feed on either land or wealth,
      • but wisdom, love and power shall be his food,
      • and ’tween two Feltros shall his birth take place.
      • Of that low Italy he ’ll be the savior,
      • for which the maid Camilla died of wounds,
      • with Turnus, Nisus and Eurỳalus.
      • And he shall drive her out of every town,
      • till he have put her back again in Hell,
      • from which the earliest envy sent her forth.
      • I therefore think and judge it best for thee
      • to follow me; and I shall be thy guide,
      • and lead thee hence through an eternal place,
      • where thou shalt hear the shrieks of hopelessness
      • of those tormented spirits of old times,
      • each one of whom bewails the second death;
      • then those shalt thou behold who, though in fire,
      • contented are, because they hope to come,
      • whene’er it be, unto the blessèd folk;
      • to whom, thereafter, if thou wouldst ascend,
      • there ’ll be for that a worthier soul than I.
      • With her at my departure I shall leave thee,
      • because the Emperor who rules up there,
      • since I was not obedient to His law,
      • wills none shall come into His town through me.
      • He rules as emperor everywhere, and there
      • as king; there is His town and lofty throne.
      • O happy he whom He thereto elects!”
      [[13]]
      • And I to him: “O Poet, I beseech thee,
      • even by the God it was not thine to know,
      • so may I from this ill and worse escape,
      • conduct me thither where thou saidst just now,
      • that I may see Saint Peter’s Gate, and those
      • whom thou describest as so whelmed with woe.”
      • He then moved on, and I behind him kept.
      • The Mission of Virgil

        • Daylight was going, and the dusky air
        • was now releasing from their weary toil
        • all living things on earth; and I alone
        • was making ready to sustain the war
        • both of the road and of the sympathy,
        • which my unerring memory will relate.
        • O Muses, O high Genius, help me now!
        • O Memory, that wrotest what I saw,
        • herewith shall thy nobility appear!
        • I then began: “Consider, Poet, thou
        • that guidest me, if strong my virtue be,
        • or e’er thou trust me to the arduous course.
        • Thou sayest that the sire of Silvio entered,
        • when still corruptible, the immortal world,
        • and that while in his body he was there.
        • Hence, that to him the Opponent of all ill
        • was courteous, considering the great result
        • that was to come from him, both who, and what,
        • seems not unfitting to a thoughtful man;
        • for he of fostering Rome and of her sway
        • in the Empyrean Heaven was chosen as sire;
        [[17]]
        • and both of these, if one would tell the truth,
        • were foreordained unto the holy place,
        • where greatest Peter’s follower hath his seat.
        • While on this quest, for which thou giv’st him praise,
        • he heard the things which of his victory
        • the causes were, and of the Papal Robe.
        • The Chosen Vessel went there afterward,
        • to bring thence confirmation in the faith,
        • through which one enters on salvation’s path.
        • But why should I go there, or who concedes it?
        • I ’m not Aeneas, nor yet Paul am I;
        • me worthy of this, nor I nor others deem.
        • If, therefore, I consent to come, I fear
        • lest foolish be my coming; thou art wise,
        • and canst much better judge than I can talk.”
        • And such as he who unwills what he willed,
        • and changes so his purpose through new thoughts,
        • that what he had begun he wholly leaves;
        • such on that gloomy slope did I become;
        • for, as I thought it over, I gave up
        • the enterprise so hastily commenced.
        • “If I have rightly understood thy words,”
        • replied the shade of that Great-hearted man,
        • “thy soul is hurt by shameful cowardice,
        • which many times so sorely hinders one,
        • that from an honored enterprise it turns him,
        • as seeing falsely doth a shying beast.
        [[19]]
        • In order that thou rid thee of this fear,
        • I ’ll tell thee why I came, and what I heard
        • the first time I was grieved on thy account.
        • Among the intermediate souls I was,
        • when me a Lady called, so beautiful
        • and happy, that I begged her to command.
        • Her eyes were shining brighter than a star,
        • when sweetly and softly she began to say,
        • as with an angel’s voice she spoke to me:
        • ‘O courteous Mantuan spirit, thou whose fame
        • is still enduring in the world above,
        • and will endure as long as lasts the world,
        • a friend of mine, but not a friend of Fortune,
        • is on his journey o’er the lonely slope
        • obstructed so, that he hath turned through fear;
        • and, from what I have heard of him in Heaven,
        • I fear lest he may now have strayed so far,
        • that I have risen too late to give him help.
        • Bestir thee, then, and with thy finished speech,
        • and with whatever his escape may need,
        • assist him so that I may be consoled.
        • I, who now have thee go, am Beatrice;
        • thence come I, whither I would fain return;
        • ’t was love that moved me, love that makes me speak.
        • When in the presence of my Lord again,
        • often shall I commend thee unto Him.’
        • Thereat she ceased to speak, and I began:
        [[21]]
        • ‘O Lady of virtue, thou through whom alone
        • the human race excels all things contained
        • within the heaven that hath the smallest circles,
        • thy bidding pleases me so much, that late
        • I ’d be, hadst thou already been obeyed;
        • thou needst but to disclose to me thy will.
        • But tell me why thou dost not mind descending
        • into this center from that ample place,
        • whither thou art so eager to return.’
        • ‘Since thou wouldst know thereof so inwardly,
        • I ’ll tell thee briefly,’ she replied to me,
        • ‘why I am not afraid to enter here.
        • Of those things only should one be afraid,
        • that have the power of doing injury;
        • not of the rest, for they should not be feared.
        • I, of His mercy, am so made by God,
        • that me your wretchedness doth not affect,
        • nor any flame of yonder fire molest.
        • There is a Gentle Lady up in Heaven,
        • who grieves so at this check, whereto I send thee,
        • that broken is stern judgment there above.
        • She called Lucìa in her prayer, and said:
        • ‘Now hath thy faithful servant need of thee,
        • and I, too, recommend him to thy care.’
        • Lucìa, hostile to all cruelty,
        • set forth thereat, and came unto the place,
        • where I with ancient Rachel had my seat.
        [[23]]
        • ‘Why, Beatrice,’ she said, ‘true Praise of God,
        • dost thou not succour him who loved thee so,
        • that for thy sake he left the common herd?
        • Dost thou not hear the anguish of his cry?
        • see’st not the death that fights him on the flood,
        • o’er which the sea availeth not to boast?
        • Ne’er were there any in the world so swift
        • to seek their profit and avoid their loss,
        • as I, after such words as these were uttered,
        • descended hither from my blessèd seat,
        • confiding in that noble speech of thine,
        • which honors thee and whosoe’er has heard it.’
        • Then, after she had spoken to me thus,
        • weeping she turned her shining eyes away;
        • which made me hasten all the more to come;
        • and, even as she wished, I came to thee,
        • and led thee from the presence of the beast,
        • which robbed thee of the fair Mount’s short approach.
        • What is it, then? Why, why dost thou hold back?
        • Why dost thou lodge such baseness in thy heart,
        • and wherefore free and daring art thou not,
        • since three so blessèd Ladies care for thee
        • within the court of Heaven, and my words, too,
        • give thee the promise of so much that’s good?”
        • As little flowers by the chill of night
        • bowed down and closed, when brightened by the sun,
        • stand all erect and open on their stems;
        [[25]]
        • so likewise with my wearied strength did I;
        • and such good daring coursed into my heart,
        • that I began as one who had been freed:
        • “O piteous she who hastened to my help,
        • and courteous thou, that didst at once obey
        • the words of truth that she addressed to thee!
        • Thou hast with such desire disposed my heart
        • toward going on, by reason of thy words,
        • that to my first intention I ’ve returned.
        • Go on now, since we two have but one will;
        • thou Leader, and thou Lord, and Teacher thou!”
        • I thus addressed him; then, when he had moved,
        • I entered on the wild and arduous course.


    I just posted An extract from The Divine Comedy by Dante Aligheri...
     :)  :D:p
    A proud member of Warlords Alliance.
    I want Revolution on the server ! ;):D:p
    • Above Man’s war-wracked world a veteran throng
    • Of singing spirits gather in the air,
    • Called from the Poets’ Heaven to take their share
    • In Right’s impending victory over Wrong.
    • Far in their van the Eagle Eye of Song
    • Looms o’er Ravenna, where he died, and where
    • He saw God’s Freedom in the dazzling glare
    • Of visions, which to every race belong.
    • Him his redeemed, united Italy —
    • Her Alps new crowned with Monza’s iron band,
    • Her Hadria wedded with her Doge’s ring —
    • Hails as the Prophet-Bard of Liberty;
    • And bids the free of every tongue and land
    • Join in her Ave, and their tribute bring.
    • The Wood and the Mountain

      • When half way through the journey of our life
      • I found that I was in a gloomy wood,
      • because the path which led aright was lost.
      • And ah, how hard it is to say just what
      • this wild and rough and stubborn woodland was,
      • the very thought of which renews my fear!
      • So bitter ’t is, that death is little worse;
      • but of the good to treat which there I found,
      • I ’ll speak of what I else discovered there.
      • I cannot well say how I entered it,
      • so full of slumber was I at the moment
      • when I forsook the pathway of the truth;
      • but after I had reached a mountain’s foot,
      • where that vale ended which had pierced my heart
      • with fear, I looked on high,
      • and saw its shoulders
      • mantled already with that planet’s rays
      • which leadeth one aright o’er every path.
      • Then quieted a little was the fear,
      • which in the lake-depths of my heart had lasted
      • throughout the night I passed so piteously.
      [[5]]
      • And even as he who, from the deep emerged
      • with sorely troubled breath upon the shore,
      • turns round, and gazes at the dangerous water;
      • even so my mind, which still was fleeing on,
      • turned back to look again upon the pass
      • which ne’er permitted any one to live.
      • When I had somewhat eased my weary body,
      • o’er the lone slope I so resumed my way,
      • that e’er the lower was my steady foot.
      • Then lo, not far from where the ascent began,
      • a Leopard which, exceeding light and swift,
      • was covered over with a spotted hide,
      • and from my presence did not move away;
      • nay, rather, she so hindered my advance,
      • that more than once I turned me to go back.
      • Some time had now from early morn elapsed,
      • and with those very stars the sun was rising
      • that in his escort were, when Love Divine
      • in the beginning moved those beauteous things;
      • I therefore had as cause for hoping well
      • of that wild beast with gaily mottled skin,
      • the hour of daytime and the year’s sweet season;
      • but not so, that I should not fear the sight,
      • which next appeared before me, of a Lion,
      • — against me this one seemed to be advancing
      • with head erect and with such raging hunger,
      • that even the air seemed terrified thereby —
      [[7]]
      • and of a she-Wolf, which with every lust
      • seemed in her leanness laden, and had caused
      • many ere now to lead unhappy lives.
      • The latter so oppressed me with the fear
      • that issued from her aspect, that I lost
      • the hope I had of winning to the top.
      • And such as he is, who is glad to gain,
      • and who, when times arrive that make him lose,
      • weeps and is saddened in his every thought;
      • such did that peaceless animal make me,
      • which, ’gainst me coming, pushed me, step by step,
      • back to the place where silent is the sun.
      • While toward the lowland I was falling fast,
      • the sight of one was offered to mine eyes,
      • who seemed, through long continued silence, weak.
      • When him in that vast wilderness I saw,
      • “Have pity on me,” I cried out to him,
      • “whate’er thou be, or shade, or very man!”
      • “Not man,” he answered, “I was once a man;
      • and both my parents were of Lombardy,
      • and Mantuans with respect to fatherland.
      • ’Neath Julius was I born, though somewhat late,
      • and under good Augustus’ rule I lived
      • in Rome, in days of false and lying gods.
      • I was a poet, and of that just man,
      • Anchises’ son, I sang, who came from Troy
      • after proud Ilion had been consumed.
      [[9]]
      • But thou, to such sore trouble why return?
      • Why climbst thou not the Mountain of Delight,
      • which is of every joy the source and cause?”
      • “Art thou that Virgil, then, that fountain-head
      • which poureth forth so broad a stream of speech?”
      • I answered him with shame upon my brow.
      • “O light and glory of the other poets,
      • let the long study, and the ardent love
      • which made me con thy book, avail me now.
      • Thou art my teacher and authority;
      • thou only art the one from whom I took
      • the lovely manner which hath done me honor.
      • Behold the beast on whose account I turned;
      • from her protect me, O thou famous Sage,
      • for she makes both my veins and pulses tremble!”
      • “A different course from this must thou pursue,”
      • he answered, when he saw me shedding tears,
      • “if from this wilderness thou wouldst escape;
      • for this wild beast, on whose account thou criest,
      • alloweth none to pass along her way,
      • but hinders him so greatly, that she kills;
      • and is by nature so malign and guilty,
      • that never doth she sate her greedy lust,
      • but after food is hungrier than before.
      • Many are the animals with which she mates,
      • and still more will there be, until the Hound
      • shall come, and bring her to a painful death.
      [[11]]
      • He shall not feed on either land or wealth,
      • but wisdom, love and power shall be his food,
      • and ’tween two Feltros shall his birth take place.
      • Of that low Italy he ’ll be the savior,
      • for which the maid Camilla died of wounds,
      • with Turnus, Nisus and Eurỳalus.
      • And he shall drive her out of every town,
      • till he have put her back again in Hell,
      • from which the earliest envy sent her forth.
      • I therefore think and judge it best for thee
      • to follow me; and I shall be thy guide,
      • and lead thee hence through an eternal place,
      • where thou shalt hear the shrieks of hopelessness
      • of those tormented spirits of old times,
      • each one of whom bewails the second death;
      • then those shalt thou behold who, though in fire,
      • contented are, because they hope to come,
      • whene’er it be, unto the blessèd folk;
      • to whom, thereafter, if thou wouldst ascend,
      • there ’ll be for that a worthier soul than I.
      • With her at my departure I shall leave thee,
      • because the Emperor who rules up there,
      • since I was not obedient to His law,
      • wills none shall come into His town through me.
      • He rules as emperor everywhere, and there
      • as king; there is His town and lofty throne.
      • O happy he whom He thereto elects!”
      [[13]]
      • And I to him: “O Poet, I beseech thee,
      • even by the God it was not thine to know,
      • so may I from this ill and worse escape,
      • conduct me thither where thou saidst just now,
      • that I may see Saint Peter’s Gate, and those
      • whom thou describest as so whelmed with woe.”
      • He then moved on, and I behind him kept.
      • The Mission of Virgil

        • Daylight was going, and the dusky air
        • was now releasing from their weary toil
        • all living things on earth; and I alone
        • was making ready to sustain the war
        • both of the road and of the sympathy,
        • which my unerring memory will relate.
        • O Muses, O high Genius, help me now!
        • O Memory, that wrotest what I saw,
        • herewith shall thy nobility appear!
        • I then began: “Consider, Poet, thou
        • that guidest me, if strong my virtue be,
        • or e’er thou trust me to the arduous course.
        • Thou sayest that the sire of Silvio entered,
        • when still corruptible, the immortal world,
        • and that while in his body he was there.
        • Hence, that to him the Opponent of all ill
        • was courteous, considering the great result
        • that was to come from him, both who, and what,
        • seems not unfitting to a thoughtful man;
        • for he of fostering Rome and of her sway
        • in the Empyrean Heaven was chosen as sire;
        [[17]]
        • and both of these, if one would tell the truth,
        • were foreordained unto the holy place,
        • where greatest Peter’s follower hath his seat.
        • While on this quest, for which thou giv’st him praise,
        • he heard the things which of his victory
        • the causes were, and of the Papal Robe.
        • The Chosen Vessel went there afterward,
        • to bring thence confirmation in the faith,
        • through which one enters on salvation’s path.
        • But why should I go there, or who concedes it?
        • I ’m not Aeneas, nor yet Paul am I;
        • me worthy of this, nor I nor others deem.
        • If, therefore, I consent to come, I fear
        • lest foolish be my coming; thou art wise,
        • and canst much better judge than I can talk.”
        • And such as he who unwills what he willed,
        • and changes so his purpose through new thoughts,
        • that what he had begun he wholly leaves;
        • such on that gloomy slope did I become;
        • for, as I thought it over, I gave up
        • the enterprise so hastily commenced.
        • “If I have rightly understood thy words,”
        • replied the shade of that Great-hearted man,
        • “thy soul is hurt by shameful cowardice,
        • which many times so sorely hinders one,
        • that from an honored enterprise it turns him,
        • as seeing falsely doth a shying beast.
        [[19]]
        • In order that thou rid thee of this fear,
        • I ’ll tell thee why I came, and what I heard
        • the first time I was grieved on thy account.
        • Among the intermediate souls I was,
        • when me a Lady called, so beautiful
        • and happy, that I begged her to command.
        • Her eyes were shining brighter than a star,
        • when sweetly and softly she began to say,
        • as with an angel’s voice she spoke to me:
        • ‘O courteous Mantuan spirit, thou whose fame
        • is still enduring in the world above,
        • and will endure as long as lasts the world,
        • a friend of mine, but not a friend of Fortune,
        • is on his journey o’er the lonely slope
        • obstructed so, that he hath turned through fear;
        • and, from what I have heard of him in Heaven,
        • I fear lest he may now have strayed so far,
        • that I have risen too late to give him help.
        • Bestir thee, then, and with thy finished speech,
        • and with whatever his escape may need,
        • assist him so that I may be consoled.
        • I, who now have thee go, am Beatrice;
        • thence come I, whither I would fain return;
        • ’t was love that moved me, love that makes me speak.
        • When in the presence of my Lord again,
        • often shall I commend thee unto Him.’
        • Thereat she ceased to speak, and I began:
        [[21]]
        • ‘O Lady of virtue, thou through whom alone
        • the human race excels all things contained
        • within the heaven that hath the smallest circles,
        • thy bidding pleases me so much, that late
        • I ’d be, hadst thou already been obeyed;
        • thou needst but to disclose to me thy will.
        • But tell me why thou dost not mind descending
        • into this center from that ample place,
        • whither thou art so eager to return.’
        • ‘Since thou wouldst know thereof so inwardly,
        • I ’ll tell thee briefly,’ she replied to me,
        • ‘why I am not afraid to enter here.
        • Of those things only should one be afraid,
        • that have the power of doing injury;
        • not of the rest, for they should not be feared.
        • I, of His mercy, am so made by God,
        • that me your wretchedness doth not affect,
        • nor any flame of yonder fire molest.
        • There is a Gentle Lady up in Heaven,
        • who grieves so at this check, whereto I send thee,
        • that broken is stern judgment there above.
        • She called Lucìa in her prayer, and said:
        • ‘Now hath thy faithful servant need of thee,
        • and I, too, recommend him to thy care.’
        • Lucìa, hostile to all cruelty,
        • set forth thereat, and came unto the place,
        • where I with ancient Rachel had my seat.
        [[23]]
        • ‘Why, Beatrice,’ she said, ‘true Praise of God,
        • dost thou not succour him who loved thee so,
        • that for thy sake he left the common herd?
        • Dost thou not hear the anguish of his cry?
        • see’st not the death that fights him on the flood,
        • o’er which the sea availeth not to boast?
        • Ne’er were there any in the world so swift
        • to seek their profit and avoid their loss,
        • as I, after such words as these were uttered,
        • descended hither from my blessèd seat,
        • confiding in that noble speech of thine,
        • which honors thee and whosoe’er has heard it.’
        • Then, after she had spoken to me thus,
        • weeping she turned her shining eyes away;
        • which made me hasten all the more to come;
        • and, even as she wished, I came to thee,
        • and led thee from the presence of the beast,
        • which robbed thee of the fair Mount’s short approach.
        • What is it, then? Why, why dost thou hold back?
        • Why dost thou lodge such baseness in thy heart,
        • and wherefore free and daring art thou not,
        • since three so blessèd Ladies care for thee
        • within the court of Heaven, and my words, too,
        • give thee the promise of so much that’s good?”
        • As little flowers by the chill of night
        • bowed down and closed, when brightened by the sun,
        • stand all erect and open on their stems;
        [[25]]
        • so likewise with my wearied strength did I;
        • and such good daring coursed into my heart,
        • that I began as one who had been freed:
        • “O piteous she who hastened to my help,
        • and courteous thou, that didst at once obey
        • the words of truth that she addressed to thee!
        • Thou hast with such desire disposed my heart
        • toward going on, by reason of thy words,
        • that to my first intention I ’ve returned.
        • Go on now, since we two have but one will;
        • thou Leader, and thou Lord, and Teacher thou!”
        • I thus addressed him; then, when he had moved,
        • I entered on the wild and arduous course.


    I just posted An extract from The Divine Comedy by Dante Aligheri...
     :)  :D:p
    dammm lol

     Deputy of S.I.N

    A chain is only as strong as its weakest link. 

     Roses fall, but the thorns remain.


  • hi

                               

    No longer on USA 1(still available on int1)
    Quit the forums on 2 oct,2018 only playing game
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